NCC Seychelles

Tips for teaching good manners

The following as the basics that should be taught at an early age

  • To say hello.
  • To say "please," "thank you," "excuse me" and "I'm sorry."
  • To show respect for older people.
  • To respect parents' and other people's privacy.
  • To speak when spoken to.
  • To not interrupt conversations of grown-ups.
  • To be quiet in public places.
  • To not touch or play with other people's possessions unless invited to.
  • To get along with siblings or other children. 

When your child meets someone new are they confident enough to introduce themselves?

Do they use PLEASE, THANK YOU, EXCUSE ME and I’M SORRY?

Do they always wait their turn to speak in a group situation?

Do they answer the telephone in a manner you approve of?

Do they take down a telephone message and make sure it reaches   the relevant person?

Are you confident they will always be polite when visiting other people’s homes?

Do they know how to be a good dinner guest?

Do they understand how to write and send thank you notes?

Please!!!

Example:

“Miss. Viviene, may I please read this book?” 

Thank you! 

Example:

“Thank you for letting me read the book.”

It is polite to say

You’re welcome!

“Miss. Vivienne , thank you for letting me pass out papers.” “You’re welcome, John!”

One important rule is to…

Always raise your hand!

This is a nice way to show the teacher you wish to speak.

At the dinner table:

  • Chew with your mouth closed
  • Ask someone to pass the food you would like to eat
  • Use your napkin, not your sleeve!
  • Don’t talk with food in your mouth
  • Keep your elbows off of the table
  • When you have a cold
  • Cover your mouth when you cough
  • Use a hankie or tissue   when you sneeze.  (If you can’t find a hankie or tissue ask to go wash your hands)!
  • Keep washing your hands!!!  If we don’t, we will spread germs to all our friends
  • When you are speaking with someone you know and someone new approaches, always make an introduction.
  • LISTEN to and concentrate on conversations—don’t just wait for your turn to talk!
  • Resist the urge to jump into a conversation when someone pauses in thought.  Wait a second or two, then respond.
  • Avoid vulgar references and swear words.