NCC Seychelles

News & Events

Discover the fun at the Subios Children’s Village 2010

‘Subios’ is the Seychelles annual underwater photo and film festival held at Beau Vallon, Mahe. The aim is to promote Seychelles as an ideal scuba diving destination by raising awareness of the varied and wonderful underwater marine world that exists within our waters.
As well as photographic and video competitions, presentations by guest speakers and a schools education programme, for 2010 a special ‘Children’s Village’ was created by the National Council for Children.

A kite flying revival is here

Freedom Square, Saturday 25th September, by 10.30 a.m. the sky was virtually a play ground for kiters.  From thought provoking, locally made fish and Serengol kites to, imported bird like, different coloured and animal shaped kites. Although the wind condition was not too favourable, there was no shortage of participants or spectators.  Children had started running around with their kites and testing the wind even before the official launch.

The Hello Campaign

'Say Hi with a Smile’ is the slogan chosen to celebrate the International Day of Peace by the National Council for Children and the Ministry of Education to promote its Living Values Programme on Saturday 25th September.

  

Anticipation and Excitement at NCC’s Children’s Village –Regatta 2010

The Regatta remains a popular event with families and kids of all ages who come to Beauvallon to  relax and enjoy the outdoors.

This year the creation of a new special area for a Children’s village created a lot of anticipation and excitement not only for children , but also for their families, caregivers and friends. The village was designed and put together by the National Council for Children with the help of the Montessori pre - school staff and volunteers.

Kite Construction workshop Saturday 7th August 2010

Learn the elements of kite construction using bamboo sticks and plastic bags.


This workshop will be facilitated by a well-known kite maker and kite flying champion Mr George Pillay.

                        

Child Protection Week 2010

I am Following in your footsteps… What are you teaching me... ?

   

Dean Loizeau: Following in his Dad’s FOOTSTEPS...

If you go to VICTORIA market on a Saturday morning  -  you will find it difficult to miss the fair complexion of a  smiling long haired  young man  among  the  many other fish vendors busy selling Karangue, Bourgeois, Job and Bekin.  The friendly young Dean Loizeau   is no other than the son of  Danny Loizeau from Bel Ombre, who has a history in Seychelles  politics. “My father says Dean Loizeau  proudly,  has influenced me personally to become the person you see in front of you today.”

Coping with Grief

Things that help you get better after a death

Talk


 
Tell someone how you feel.
 
Remember
 
Think about the good times you had.
 
Make a special memory, eg. collect all the photos you have and make a book.
 
Draw a picture of all the things you liked.
 
Write a story - get someone to help you.
 
Plant a special plant to remind you.
 

Being a dad is probably the most important job you’ll ever do

The way you behave with your kids will have a big effect on them – what they do, how they feel about themselves and how they turn out. As with anything that is important to you, being a dad deserves your time, energy and effort.

Studies have shown that kids whose dads spend time with them and are interested in them do better at school, are happier and more confident and have higher self-esteem.

Kids need dads who spend time with them
Ideas to try
- Kids love stories, especially about people they know. Tell them about when you were a kid.

Group Sessions for the Foyer de Nazareth and St Elizabeth orphanages

Certain members from the Psychology & Counseling Section organized educational group sessions for the Foyer de Nazareth and St Elizabeth orphanages.

First Aid Training

             

Target group: Workers/ Care takers

Aims: To develop knowledge and understanding of the basic first aid techniques to preserve life, limit worsening of conditions and promote recovery of casualty.